DRAFT

Cape Cornwall School

 

Using Pupil Premium Funding Successfully to

 

Raise Achievement and Aspiration.

 

2019- 2020

 

Dream, Believe, Persevere, Achieve

 

Introduction

 

Pupil Premium funding is provided by the Department of Education to provide additional support for students to remove barriers to learning, and in doing so, to raise educational outcomes.

 

The additional funding is targeted at students from low- income families (eligible for free school meals at any time in the last 6 years), as well as children in care, adopted children and children of services personnel. The school is responsible for deciding how the funding is spent and for monitoring and evaluating the impact of the funding.

 

School Vision and Values

 

Cape Cornwall School aims to ensure that all young people reach their full potential and aspire to be the best they can be. We believe that every student has something special to offer and it is important to us that students’ talents are nurtured and encouraged. To be the best you can requires confidence, self-belief and self-esteem and requires us to relate positively to others. We believe that our school community must do all we can to remove barriers to learning and we use the Pupil Premium funding to support these aims.

 

There are approximately 264 students on roll at Cape Cornwall School. Of these, 68 are eligible for pupil premium funding. In 2018-2019 Cape Cornwall School received around £80,000 of Pupil Premium funding. In 2019-2020 we expect to receive around £80,000 of Pupil Premium funding.

 

The DofE gives schools the responsibility for allocating the Pupil Premium funding, as we see fit, based upon our understanding of our students’ needs, as stated:

 

“It is for schools to decide how the Pupil Premium, allocated to schools per FSM student, is spent since they are best placed to assess what additional provision should be made for the individual students within their responsibility.”

 

We are accountable for the use of this additional funding and for monitoring its impact on student progress, attendance and behaviour. School leaders allocate the funding for strategies which we know (from national research and best practice) are most likely to impact positively on improving outcomes for students. These strategies are evaluated regularly and frequently and we adapt strategies during the year to ensure that they are benefiting students, supporting progress and making a real difference to students’ achievements. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Priority Areas to improve educational achievement for students eligible for Pupil Premium funding at Cape Cornwall School:

 

  1. Improving attendance of students eligible for Pupil Premium funding – Attendance of disadvantaged students is below that of their peers. Persistent absence for disadvantaged students is higher than that of their peers. The gap is beginning to close, and both attendance and persistent absence are improving, but significant further improvement is still required. Absence from school is a key barrier to educational progress as evidenced by our own school data, and national data on student outcomes.

 

  1. Improving behaviour of students eligible for Pupil Premium funding – When compared with their peers, a higher percentage of behaviour points and fixed term exclusions are given to students eligible for Pupil Premium funding. Poor behaviour is a key barrier to educational progress as evidenced by our own school data, and national data on student outcomes.

 

  1. Improving progress and achievement of the most able students who are eligible for Pupil Premium funding – The progress and achievement of the most able students eligible for Pupil Premium funding is not yet in line with that of their peers.

 

The following targets for 2019-2020 have been set based on the current priority improvement areas:

 

  1. To improve attendance of students eligible for pupil premium funding so that the in school gap between the attendance of students eligible for Pupil Premium funding and that of their peers is no more than 1.5%. In doing so, to improve attendance so that it is at least in line with national averages for non-disadvantaged students. To reduce persistent absence so that it is at least in line with national averages for non-disadvantaged students.

 

 

  1. To improve behaviour of students eligible for pupil premium funding so that fixed term exclusions are below the national average of 8.6%. To improve behaviour so that pupil premium students are awarded a proportional number of Merits which are at least in line with their non-disadvantaged peers. To reduce behaviour points for disadvantaged students and fixed term exclusions so that these are proportional to the number of disadvantaged students are at least in line with their non-disadvantaged peers.

 

 

  1. To improve progress and achievement of students eligible for pupil premium funding, particularly that of most able students so that progress and attainment are at least in line with that of all students nationally with similar starting points, with an aspiration to achieve comparable progress and attainment of their non-disadvantaged peers.

 

 

In addition to these targets, the pupil premium funding is used to:

  • Promote effective and confident skills in literacy and numeracy, ensuring students who are below their age related expectation on entry are supported to catch up.

 

  • Provide high quality pastoral, social and emotional support for students to promote equality of access to educational opportunity.

 

  • Provide a carefully planned, rich and relevant curriculum that engages students in learning, promotes success for all and provides a springboard for future education and employment.
  • Support the aspirations of students to succeed in education and life and progress to further education and employment.

 

 

In planning how to spend the funding, school leaders have used a set of principles:

 

  1. The funding is solely for spending on students eligible for pupil premium.

 

  1. It is focussed on supporting eligible students to reach the highest levels of achievement.

 

  1. The impact of spending is regularly evaluated to ensure impact and value for money.

 

  1. Improvement in the quality of education for students eligible for pupil premium funding is an integral part of whole school improvement planning.

 

  1. Development of staff skills to ensure the highest quality teaching and support every-day is prioritised, including the provision of high quality staff training.

 

  1. The role of parents in supporting progress, behaviour and attendance of students, in partnership with staff, is seen as crucial to student success.

 

  1. Funding is allocated for strategies which have a proven track record of success either within the school, based on national research (endorsed by the Education Endowment Foundation), or drawn from other schools where there is evidence of high outcomes for students as a result of the strategies.

 

 

Using the Pupil Premium funding at Cape Cornwall School

 

There is a stable trend in the number of students eligible for Pupil Premium funding at Cape Cornwall School.

 

Year Group (2019-2020)

7

8

9

10

11

% student eligible for Pupil Premium funding

 

27%

 

26.8%

 

27.5%

 

19%

 

29.6%

 

 

Key Contacts:

Lead Governor:  Mrs. J. Cashmore (Chair of Governors)

The Headteacher:  Mrs. J. Woodhouse

The Head of School: Mrs S Crawley

 

Pupil Premium Strategy Statement for Cape Cornwall School 2019-2020

  1. Summary Information

Academic Year

2019-2020

Total PP funding (estimated)

£80,000

Most Recent Internal Review

November 2019

Total number of students

264

Number of students eligible for PP funding

68

Date of next internal review

April 2020

 

  1. Progress and attainment (2019 Outcomes)

 

Students eligible for PP

Students not eligible for PP funding

National average (non-PP) 2019

KS2 Average Point score

4.56

4.94

4.8

Basics (English and Maths at Grade 5 or above)

21%

67%

42%

Basics (English and Maths at Grade 4 or above)

50%

71%

65%

Progress 8 score

-0.34

0.21

0.008

Figures to be confirmed when school and national validated data is available 2019 outcomes.

  1. Barriers to progress and attainment (for students eligible for PP funding)

In-school barriers

A

Disadvantaged students are making less academic progress than non-disadvantaged students. Key priorities are to improve progress in English, Maths, Science, Humanities and Languages.

B

A minority of disadvantaged students are less secure in their planning for future education and careers which is linked to low aspirations.

C

Higher than national average proportions of disadvantaged students are persistently absent from school. Attendance for disadvantaged students is below national average and has a detrimental impact on students’ capacity to make good progress in learning.

D

When compared to their non-disadvantaged peers, students eligible for pupil premium funding achieve fewer merits, receive a higher number of behaviour points and are more frequently involved in behaviours that result in fixed term exclusions. This lower engagement and poor behaviour is having a detrimental impact on their progress.

E

The literacy skills of disadvantaged students are not sufficiently strong to underpin strong progress across the curriculum. This is evidenced by their KS2 test outcomes on entry to Cape Cornwall School, in reading and writing, which show a gap in achievement with their non-disadvantaged peers. The numeracy skills of disadvantaged students are also lower than those of their non-disadvantaged peers on entry to the school.

F

A significant proportion of our students have difficulties with their social skills, managing emotions, self- confidence and resilience. This is not isolated to disadvantaged students and it does mean that certain students (who are more likely to be disadvantaged) struggle to access their educational opportunities as a result.

External barriers

A

The surrounding area is very rural and some disadvantaged students have reduced access to opportunities to develop their personal, cultural and social education.

B

There are limited career opportunities in the local area and Penwith has lower than average annual incomes. Students may therefore not experience the same opportunities to consider a range of careers and options for future education as their peers in other parts of the country.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Desired outcomes (and how they will be measured)

A

Improve progress for disadvantaged students so that they make comparable progress to their peers in school and nationally. In particular, continue to improve outcomes in English, Maths, Science Humanities and Languages. Improve literacy and numeracy skills of disadvantaged students so that they catch up with their non-disadvantaged peers.

Higher rates of progress for disadvantaged students mean that the in-school gap in achievement is not more than 10% in all subjects.  Progress 8 for disadvantaged students to be positive (above national average) with the aspiration to achieve comparable progress and attainment to non-disadvantaged peers nationally.

B

Improve career progression and raise aspirations for disadvantaged students.

Increase the proportion of disadvantaged students who progress to Level 2 and 3 courses in further education. No disadvantaged students to be NEET post 16.

C

Improve attendance of students eligible for PP funding, and reduce persistent absence so that it is in line with that of their non-PP peers and above national average

Attendance of disadvantaged students to be above national average.

Persistent absence for disadvantaged students to be below national average.

Our aspiration is that the attendance and persistent absence of students eligible for PP funding is comparable to that of their non-disadvantaged peers nationally.

D

Improve behaviour of disadvantaged students.

Reduce the number and frequency of fixed term exclusions for disadvantaged students and the number of behaviour points. Increase the number of merits.

Reduce fixed term exclusion and behaviour points for disadvantaged students overall so that these are no greater than their peers. Increase the number of merits so these are in line with their peers.

E

Improve students’ social skills, emotional management, resilience and emotional health

Behaviour, attendance and progress are comparable to that of non-PP students. Students exhibit the required emotional regulation, social behaviours and mental health to have equality of access to educational opportunity.

 

 

Long Term Plan (3 Year Strategy)

Priority 1

Power of Languagea significant gap in literacy has been identified between our disadvantaged students and our non-disadvantaged learners that exists on entry to the school in Year 7. This includes spelling, use of written and spoken language, non-formal language, and vocabulary specifically linked to cultural capital and the breadth of students’ knowledge base.

Priority 2

Metacognitionsuccess in education relies on the ability of students to retain and recall prior learning, in a knowledge rich curriculum. Self- understanding and cognitive learning strategies are therefore foundations of educational progress and success.

Priority 3

Aspiration and Experiences – the gap in aspiration and breadth of cultural experiences that our disadvantaged students exhibit on entry to the school creates educational disadvantage. To remedy this, the school must offer a wealth of wider social and cultural experiences to provide equality of educational opportunity for all.

Priority 4

Pastoral care and support – the school must provide highly effective additional care and support for disadvantaged students across a broad range of areas, all of which are fundamental to educational progress and success. These include: attendance, behaviour, mental health, social skills and confidence, self esteem, managing personal risk and safety, homework, organisation. The school will invest in securing effective systems and protocols to support each child to achieve their full potential.

 

NB Budgeted costs are provisional until validated by our Business Manager

Desired Outcome: A. Improve progress for disadvantaged students. In particular, continue to improve outcomes in English and Maths, Science and Humanities and Languages. So that, as a result, P8 and A8 of disadvantaged students are significantly above national average for non-disadvantaged students and approach our aspiration to achieve equivalent outcomes to non-disadvantaged students nationally.

Chosen approaches

Rationale

Staff Lead

Evaluation

Funding

  1. Recruit the very best school leaders and teachers and provide high quality training to sustain the highest standards of education for students across the school.
  • New teachers employed in Geography, science, English with effective support and induction.
  • Curriculum leader development roles implemented
  • Nationally recognised training (NPQML, NPQSL) available to emerging middle and senior leaders
  • CPD programme for teachers includes Trust-wide ETP, Aspiring middle and senior leader programmes, collaborative school partnerships
  • National PP ‘expert’ to deliver Secondary Partnership training for all staff in January 2019.

 

The Education Endowment Foundation (EEF) evidences that improving teaching has the largest impact on outcomes for disadvantaged students. Recruitment, retention, highly effective leadership and high quality teaching is at the heart of educational success for students.

 

 

Executive Headteacher

Through monitoring and evaluation of quality of teaching: faculty, senior leader and external monitoring and evaluation processes including lesson visits, work scrutiny, student progress reviews

 

Recruitment costs: £6500

 

Staff training costs

£4500

  1. Refine tracking and assessment systems to target intervention and introduce the use of comparative judgements as an effective methodology for summative assessment. Provide high quality staff training.

 

Review and further development of school assessment systems to ensure these are accurate and effective in diagnosing gaps in knowledge and misconceptions. Accurate and timely assessment enables teachers to adapt teaching and provide incisive intervention to accelerate progress.

 

HoS

Through monitoring and evaluation of quality of teaching: faculty, senior leader and external monitoring and evaluation processes including lesson visits, work scrutiny, student progress reviews

Staff training

£600

 

Admin time for revised systems £1000

  1. Provide bespoke intervention sessions for students to address identified gaps in learning and knowledge.

Targeted intervention will accelerate the progress of students at risk of falling behind. The school’s analysis of student achievement evidences that intervention sessions are effective in boosting progress.

 

HoS

Analysis of student outcomes and progress following completion of programme of intervention

Teacher salary costs

£1000

  1. Curriculum plans well sequenced to address gaps in learning and barriers from gaps in cultural capital. To include explicit teaching of recall, literacy and numeracy and linked to future employment and career aspirations.

Review and development of whole school curriculum strategy, in collaboration with secondary partner schools. The quality of the curriculum underpins the quality of education and therefore is a key driver to enhance student learning and improve outcomes.

 

HoS

Monitoring of completion of curriculum development plan. Through monitoring and evaluation of quality of teaching: faculty, senior leader and external monitoring and evaluation processes including lesson visits, work scrutiny, student progress reviews

Teacher time and training costs

 

£1200

  1. Improve literacy skills of students to remove barriers to educational progress and achievement

Accelerated reader to continue for Years 7 and 8 as a universal offer for students. The school’s evaluation of student reading levels evidences the very significant impact of AR on improving reading. Training for teachers in explicit teaching of literacy skills across all curriculum areas and leadership of literacy as fundamental to student progress and success, and preparation for next stage of education.

 

AHT

Monitoring of AR data to evaluate impact on student reading skills (termly)

Evaluation and QA of curriculum planning re literacy skills

Lesson visits and work scrutiny.

Proportionate AR costs

 

£1200

  1. Provide equipment and resources for students to ensure access to curriculum and to support effective revision.

A minority of students do not have the basic equipment needed to access the curriculum and learning opportunities. This creates a fundamental barrier to learning.

HoS

Behaviour points for equipment for PP students to be comparable to those for non PP students, with an aspiration of 0 equipment points for PP students

£1500

  1. Address the barriers to learning of students on transition to secondary school, including identified gaps in literacy and numeracy through a bespoke intervention programme including the use of tutor time

A cohort of student do not achieve their age related national expectation at the end of KS2 and this is a significant barrier to their access to the secondary curriculum. Addressing these skills early, through intervention will promote progress.

HoS and SENDCo

Evaluation through review of student progress, lesson visits and work scrutiny

Intervention sessions and teacher costs

Part funded by catch up premium

 

£1200

  1. Devise and implement a ‘cultural capital’ programme for tutor time which address gaps in students’ knowledge and understanding of society and global values

Our disadvantaged students are impeded in knowledge acquisition by gaps in cultural and societal understanding which are apparent on entry in Year 7

Lead teacher

Evaluated through student voice and staff feedback, termly

Staff time

 

£1500

B Improve career progression and raise aspirations for disadvantaged students.

  1. Improve careers education programme through curriculum development, explicit teaching of careers education in all subject areas (in schemes of learning in all subject areas) assemblies and tutor programme to fully achieve the Gatsby Benchmarks.

Improving education will broaden students’ aspirations and understanding of career opportunities. Partnership 

 

 

Leadership of careers education by AHT (partnership)

 

 

 

 

Destinations data and scrutiny of post 16 applications. Student feedback on their experience of career education.

£3200

  1. Provide high quality additional one to one reviews for disadvantaged students with the careers advisor

Individual support will identify and address gaps in understanding re career options and routes and individual action plans will support students to understand the steps they need to take to progress to their next stage of education/ employment

Careers advisor

Destinations data. Review of impact of careers advisor

£1600

  1. Ensure all disadvantaged students participate in opportunities to experience post 16 education including visits to FE and HE colleges

Opportunities to experience post 16 education settings will broaden and extend aspiration

Careers Advisor

Evaluate attendance on school visits to ensure all disadvantaged students experience a minimum of 1 visit to HE and FE setting.

Subsidised trip places

£1000

  1. All disadvantaged students to have mock interview and work experience placement in Year 10

Student voice evidences that mock interview and work experience are instrumental in raising aspiration for next stage of education

AHT

Monitor mock interview appointments and work experience placements to ensure all students access this opportunity. Student voice feedback

Staff salary costs

£1500

C Improve attendance of disadvantaged students and, in particular, reduce persistent absence so that it is better than national averages for disadvantaged students and approaches our aspiration of being comparable to national averages for non-disadvantaged students.

  1. High quality leadership of attendance strategies is crucial to their success. Refine and embed revised systems for rewarding good attendance and intervening where attendance is a concern including early intervention and the role of tutors.

 

In 2018-2019, some improvement was made in attendance and reducing persistent absence through revised approaches.

Improving attendance will ensure gaps in learning are minimised and students have full access to opportunities and education. Our in school data evidences that poor attendance has been shown to have a significant negative impact on students’ progress and achievement.

AHT

Half termly evaluation of attendance and persistent absence

Admin and leadership time

£6500

 

Rewards

£500

 

  1. Prioritise use of Education Welfare Officer for disadvantaged students.

The EWO was highly effective in 2018-2019 in improving attendance of target students through family intervention and support.

AHT

Half termly evaluation of attendance and persistent absence

EWO costs

 

£3000

  1. Pilot use of wake up calls for disadvantaged students in the spring term

This has proved effective in other schools to motivate students to attend school

AHT

Half termly evaluation of impact and student voice

Admin costs

£1000

  1. Incentivise students’ good attendance through the use of rewards, including pop up weeks.

This proved effective in 2018-2019 in improving attendance of disadvantaged students.

AHT

Half termly evaluation of attendance

Cost of rewards (part funded by local community partners)

£600

D Improve behaviour of disadvantaged students and reduce exclusions so that disadvantaged students achieve equivalent numbers of merits to their non-disadvantaged peers and so that they receive no more behaviour points than their non-disadvantaged peers. Exclusions for disadvantaged students to be below national averages with an aspiration that they are below the national average for non-disadvantaged students. In line with our aspiration for all students, our aspiration is that no disadvantaged student is permanently excluded from the school.

  1. High quality leadership of behaviour strategies is crucial to their success
  2. Pegasus project used to engage and motivate target students and to provide individual mentoring.

 

Engaging and motivating students will improve progress in learning and aspirations.

 

Mentoring has been shown through our evaluation of in-school data to be effective in increasing engagement and removing barriers to education and progress.

Assistant Headteacher

Evaluation of impact of Pegasus after each programme completion, and of sustained impact on behaviour over the school year

Leadership costs £3000

 

Pegasus costs £4000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Mentoring of priority students by form tutors, leaders and pastoral team.

 

There are multiple opportunities for student mentoring as a proven successful strategy to promote improved behaviour.

AHT

Evaluation of impact of mentoring behaviour. Half termly review of merits, behaviour points and exclusions

Staff costs

£3000

  1. Provision of alternative education programmes to avoid permanent exclusion.

Alternative education packages including Harbour School, managed moves, PAPA and SAVVY are provided for students at risk of exclusion. These have proved effective in supported students’ continued education and avoiding permanent exclusion.

AHT

Termly review of impact of alternative education packages. More regular monitoring of student progress through these packages, in line with school protocols for management of alternative education.

£23,500

  1. Incentivise students’ good behaviour through the appropriate use of rewards.

This proved effective in 2018-2019 in improving behaviour of disadvantaged students.

AHT

Half termly evaluation of attendance, student voice

Cost of rewards (part funded by local community partners)

£600

F Provide high quality school systems and pastoral support to remedy barriers to learning for vulnerable students including low self esteem, emotional health, and resilience.

  1.  Provide targeted mentoring and support for vulnerable students through high quality and effective pastoral care.

Our in-school analysis evidences the effectiveness of mentoring in supporting individual students to engage fully in educational opportunity

AHT

Impact of mentoring evaluated termly through behaviour and attendance data and through student progress data

Staff salary costs

£2000

  1. Embed TIS strategies across the school and ensure staff are trained to anticipate and react to students’ emotional needs

TIS strategies are backed by evidence based research as effective in supporting students to manage their emotions and to respond positively to educational challenge and new experiences

AHT

Evaluation of impact of TIS approaches (annual)

Staff salary costs

Part funded through Headstart

£1500

  1. Implement a programme of strategies to support emotionally healthy education. Implement the Be Inspired programme to broaden educational opportunity and address gaps in cultural opportunity

Positive emotional health is a foundation to being able to engage fully with educational opportunity, underpinning resilience, self-confidence and self-esteem.

Evidence shows that our disadvantaged students have restricted access to sporting, cultural and social experiences beyond the school provision. Access to extra-curricular opportunities after school is restricted by transport costs, caring responsibilities (for some) and student motivation to stay on after school.

Leadership role

Evaluation of impact of strategies bi-annually through student voice, staff feedback and analysis of participation

 

Evaluation of impact of Be Inspired through review of student choices, lesson visits, student voice, attendance and behaviour data

Staff salary costs

£1600

 

Resources for strategies

£1800

 

Be Inspired resources

£1800

G Other Spending Commitments

There is a legacy of commitment to fund school transport costs from outside the catchment area for the final year. The projected cost is £5500. This commitment is not continuing beyond the current academic year as our evaluation is that this is not effective in raising outcomes for students.

Total: £82,405

 

Tel: 01736 788501